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Fire Resistance

Fire Resistance

BLOCK DOES NOT BURN

Photo above is a concrete block home, the only remaining building in the entire neighborhood (being sensitive to the current situation, this was taken from an older California fire).

The photo at left shows a metal stud wall only seconds into a fire test (Hose Stream). The short video clip can be viewed here. Metal studs are more fire retardant than wood studs so a wood stud wall would perform significantly worse than what the metal stud wall did in this video.

The concrete block wall at left after the same Hose Stream fire test. The wall remained intact and completely structural. View the test here. Omni Block’s System 12 is fire-rated at 4 hours and the System 8 is fire-rated at 2.7 hours.

The actual test results for Omni Block walls is available at Fire Testing.

U-factor and ComCheck

U-factor and ComCheck

The following pages discuss how to use ComCheck and Omni Block’s U-factor to achieve the code energy requirements. It is assumed that the reader has a working knowledge of the Department of Energy’s software program ComCheck.

For a downloadable pdf click here.

Mortar Joint Illustration

Mortar Joint Illustration

There are insulated block systems on the market that make claims of continuous insulation within their block and upon close examination, they do. However, that examination also reveals that there is no insulation spanning the mortar joints in a total wall assembly. Since mortar joints account for at least 6% of the total wall, this would not be considered continuous insulation.

Omni Block does not claim to have continuous insulation. Continuous insulation is not required in the IECC, specifically the Performance Path section of the code. Omni Block does have two independent layers of insulation inserts for the System 8 and 3 independent layers of insulation included in the System 12. Additionally, the insulation in both Systems span the mortar joints (vertically and horizontally). 

To download the pdf version click here complete with calculations.

Hoover High School Field House

Hoover High School Field House

Architect: Hasenstab Architects
Akron, Ohio
www.hasenstabinc.com
Contact: Greg Chaplin
email: gchaplin@hasenstabinc.com

General Contractor & Mason: Imhoff Construction Services
Orrville, Ohio
www.imhoffinc.com
Contact: Ryan Imhoff
email: rimhoff@imhoffinc.com

 

Manufacturer: Cement Products, Inc.
Mansfield, Ohio
Contact: Rick Knapper: 330-256-8836
email: rknapper@continentalproducts.net
Product: Omni RichBlok (smooth face CMU)
Colors: Obsidian, Burnt Orange and Glacier

Omni Block was exclusively used on the new Hoover High School Field House at Memorial Stadium in North Canton, Ohio. 

Shop Drawing

REBAR PLACEMENT

The placement of vertical rebar is critical to any concrete block project. Since Omni Block is an insulated system that provides unsurpassed thermal efficiency the insulation inserts need to be installed in all un-grouted cells.

To view a comprehensive detailed sample layout with block and specific rebar placement click on SHOP DRAWING.

Structural engineering always “trumps” insulation, but hopefully structural engineers keep the rebar and grout to a minimum without sacrificing structural strength. All Omni Block buildings are individually engineered and the vertical frequency varies depending upon many structural considerations. One #5 rebar every 48″ vertically and the use of standard ladder rod in lieu of horizontal bond beams provides the most ideal situation.

It should be noted that at every corner and at every window and door jamb there is an 8″ cell that is fully grouted with the appropriate rebar. Once those are placed then the interior 6″ cells are determined and are fully grouted with rebar.

Three Little Pigs

Three Little Pigs

Which little piggy will you be? The one that builds out of straw? The one that builds out of wood? Or the smart little piggy that builds out of Omni Block?

Glass has a higher R-Value than block?

Glass has a higher R-Value than block?

R-Value is the derived industry standard of measuring how products perform in laboratory conditions. However, we do not live and work in a laboratory condition. It is therefore important to consider the real world conditions of all building materials. Omni Block is the best thermally performing building product for the money available on the market.

Law of Diminishing Returns

Law of Diminishing Returns

Building material R-Values are tested in a uniform laboratory testing method. The problem often lies within the “non-perfect” installation techniques that are commonplace in the construction industry. These 3 slides illustrate a) that there is a Law of Diminishing Returns when it comes to R-Value; b) that a small insulation void or improper insulation installation can greatly reduce the expected R-Value performance of a wall assembly; and c) how those voids are shown via infrared imagery (the camera does not lie). Just more REAL WORLD LOGIC from Omni Block.

More Insulation in the Roof?

 More Insulation in the Roof?

There are short-cuts or some would say “loopholes” in the IECC for architects and designers to use in order to meet the minimums set forth for the thermal envelope. Does this strategy follow “best practices” within our industry? Maybe logic should be used rather than finding a loophole in the code. The cartoon above provides a humorous slant on a clear misuse of a code loophole.

Faith Community Lutheran Church

Breaking ground the first of April 2018, the new Faith Community Lutheran Church will be located on Town Center just north of the 215 Beltway. The architect, Jim Van Compernolle designed the church and multi-purpose rooms utilizing a significant amount of the visibly exposed and highly insulated Omni Block system. The general contractor is DC Building Group and the scheduled mason is Hirschi Masonry, both of Las Vegas, NV.

Construction photos to be added as progress is made on the site.